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July 28, 2011

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I am a student of SHER-E-BANGLA AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY . have any scholarship for undergraduate in agriculture sector ?

Hello Anwar. I am not sure about agriculture specifically, but here is the website for the Fulbright program that brings students from around the world into the US: http://foreign.fulbrightonline.org/

And here is contact information for people who work for this program: http://foreign.fulbrightonline.org/contact_us.html

I hope you will find an answer to your question!

Hi Anna,

A fellow writer here. In the process of doing a Fulbright application in creative writing, but my advisor seems intent on convincing me to apply for an ETA (and create a creative writing workshop).

I wondered, do you think it's more difficult to land a Fulbright in the arts than an ETA? A random question, I know. Would you mind, maybe, elaborating on your creative writing proposal?

Sincerely,

Ray

Thank you for this information. It is so much easier to work through than what's on the official website.

Thank you, Rose. Good luck moving forward.

Ray, oh dear: I didn't see your questions until now. But on the chance that it is still relevant for you, here goes.

Regarding ETAs: I can only offer my utter SPECULATION that it is easier to get an ETA than a project grant, if only because you are being evaluated more completely on your ability to be a good "ambassador" abroad, rather than on the "ambassador" thing AS WELL AS your capability regarding your project proposal. Also, I believe more ETA positions are available overall. At the Fulbright Student site, you should be able to find or download number breakdowns for each country based on number of applications, number of acceptances, and the kinds of grants given. That should give you a better sense of the odds for the places you are thinking about going.

About my creative writing proposal: at risk of repeating a bit of what I said in the post, I made a case for going to Kenya to divide my time on short fiction of mine that explicitly draws from Kenyan history and culture, and also to facilitate writing workshops with three different organizations/schools in Nairobi. I emphasized my ongoing interest in Kenyan and East African literary culture, citing specific examples. I discussed my background in successfully working as an independent writer and in facilitating writing workshops in many different kinds of communities, including with people very different than me. I talked about the limits of imagination: particularly as a white English-speaking American, penning stories set in Nairobi without having set foot there is a Very Bad Idea. I talked about why I needed to go there and see things for myself, to have my own experiences to draw from, and to do first-hand research. I made clear that I was going in with a set of skills and interests, but with an utmost feeling for discovery.

I will add that I had several very insightful people read my essays that their feedback was INVALUABLE in not just getting my words right, but in helping hone what it is I wanted to do.

Thank you so much for your blog. I'm an MFA Creative Writing student looking to apply for a Fulbright program. I never considered Kenya. How did you did you find out about the writing program in Kenya and do you have any suggestions about where to find other programs I may apply to?


Best
Rhonda

In your experience, do graduating seniors ever get creative writing Fulbrights? I'm thinking specifically creative nonfiction.

I don't know of any graduating seniors who got one of these, R., but that's no reason why you shouldn't give it a try. They do prioritize a demonstrated commitment to writing, but leave it flexible on what form that might take.

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